Selling your Art on POD Websites – Redbubble vs. Society6

Selling your art on POD websites Redbubble edition

Hey guys, I’m back with another comparison post about selling your art on POD (Print on Demand) websites!

This time I’m comparing 2 popular websites I sell my artwork on, Society6 and Redbubble.  I’ve broken down my comparison into sections to make it easier to compare and hopefully find what you’re looking for more easily.

So read on to learn more about selling your art on POD websites and find out which one might work best for you!

Store Front

As of this time, I prefer Rebubble’s store frontStore fronts are easily customized with a header, profile photo, bio, optional journal entries, and collections.  Your latest art works are also shown this page.

On the design page you will see the default product you chose when uploading the artwork, and below that is a button to show which other products are available.  You can also see reviews (of the product, not your art) and comments people have left you.  [Pro tip – leaving comments is a great way to connect with other Redbubble artists!]

You can also “like” designs and “follow” other artists on both websites, which I recommend doing.

Society6 has recently changed store fronts, and I think (hope) it’s still working out some kinks (as of March 2018).  Right now, your store will default to the “Shop” view and show your most recently sold products at the top.  As you scroll down it starts showing the same design on several different product types, which I don’t like.  I’d rather see all different designs. If you want to see all of your different designs you have to use the filters to the left and choose Sort By: New, then choose just one product type to view.

You can still customize your store front with a banner and a logo or profile image.


Both Society6 and Redbubble cater towards a young, hip, and trendy audience.  Think festival gear, college dorm or first apartment decor, stickers, and unique accessories. Trendy pattern designs and sayings are popular on both websites.

The audience on Redbubble might be slightly younger than Society6 as they focus more on stickers which are popular with teenagers and young adults.  However, Society6 recently introduced stickers too which are gaining in popularity.

Overall I think the target audience for both of these sites are young adults (20s and 30s) and their parents buying gifts for them.

Ease of Upload

Redbubble’s uploading tool is the easiest of the POD sites I’ve tried.

It’s great because you can upload your main design and then customize it for each product type.  There are options for tiling the image (to create a pattern), or you can replace the image entirely if neither of those options work.

You can also change the background colour on Redbubble, which is handy when working with designs that have a transparent background.

Society6 has recently changed their uploading tool and made it more like Redbubble’s, which is great, but it’s a little glitchy and you can’t tile or change the background colour.  It’s not a big issue – you just have to adjust your image accordingly. Also, transparent (png) images don’t work well except for stickers.

In general, both are pretty easy to upload but Redbubble has the edge in my opinion.


In terms of products, both offer a similar range which includes apparel, electronics cases, and home decor items. The prices are about on par with other online POD stores and they often run 20% off or other similar promotions.

Redbubble has some unique products that are not on Society6, such as mini skirtsdresses and scarves among others.

blue gold mandala pattern scarf redbubble

The quality is pretty good on both sites and varies depending on the product.

I have a really nice tapestry from Society6 that I used as a bed sheet and is now on my wall. Friends have purchased mugs and beach towels and were very happy with what they received.  T-shirts and hoodies can be hit or miss.

Both websites add new types of products from time to time so look out for that.

Earnings and Payment

Redbubble earnings are paid automatically around the 15th of every month (to Paypal, or direct deposit), and there is no minimum threshold so you are paid whatever you made in the previous month whether its $1 or $1000.

Society6 pays automatically to Paypal, with whatever balance you have on the 1st of the month.

Both are reliable and I haven’t had any issues getting paid from either.


The folks at Redbubble and Society6 are pretty good at marketing and driving traffic to their respective sites, so it’s mostly a matter of getting your own designs out there (which is easier said than done).

Check out my post on Social Media Marketing Tips for Artists to learn more about marketing your designs.

Most products have nice display images that you can screenshot and use for your own marketing initiatives.  You can also find some nice promotional tools on the Redbubble blog, such as fun templates like this:

doughnut pillow mock up

Society6 has recently introduced a curator link on each product page, so you can receive extra royalty not only on your own products but other’s as well!

Another nice thing that Society6 does is they will send an email out before a sale so you can prepare, and they provide you with an overlay to create your ads. Usually it’s just text containing the discount and promo code so you can layer it over or within your own images.


cyber monday.jpg


Redbubble and Society6 both have reasonable shipping costs which varies depending on the product and package weight.

Redbubble has headquarters located in San Francisco (U.S.) and Melbourne (Australia) so the products are shipped from one of those areas depending on your location.  Also, you get a free sticker with purchase and their packaging is super cute.

Society6’s headquarters is also in California but some products are manufactured in different locations within the U.S., so you might get multiple packages.  Sometimes they offer free shipping worldwide promotions.

Shipping from both stores is pretty quick, and you can choose a faster shipping method if required.

Note: Some products take longer to manufacture than others so it could take longer to ship and receive!


Both Society6 and Redbubble are great options for selling your artwork online, but I have to say I prefer Redbubble!

However, both have great things to offer and it all depends on what you feel comfortable with and works with your art style.

Personally, I use both because, as they say, don’t put all of your eggs in one basket 😉

Want to learn more about selling your art online?  Here are some more great posts to check out!

A more in-depth analysis of selling on Redbubble

Selling your art on Zazzle vs. Society6 

10 Websites to Sell your Art Online

Social Media Marketing Tips for Artists

Blogging for Your Art Business


Mandala Drawing Templates

mandala worksheet template

My friends, I have created some templates to help draw mandalas more easily!  

Using these, you will no longer need to use a compass or random household objects to draw circles for your mandalas.

To download the templates: Click on the image of the template to open in full size, then right click and download or print straight from your browser.

Then, you can either draw straight on the print-out or place it underneath another sheet of paper and trace.


In person the lines underneath are more apparent, so it is very easy to see and trace them. I simply used a few paperclips to keep the 2 pieces of paper together, but you could use a bit of tape or something else you have handy.

Note: The image above shows the template under printer paper so it may show through sketchbook paper slightly less, but should still be well enough to trace.

This second template with no cross lines works better if you are going for a more free-style of mandala design.

mandala template work sheet

Here are a couple of mandalas I made with these templates:

coloured mandala

mandala black white blog


I used the first template to draw the coloured mandala by tracing it, and for the black and white mandala I drew it straight on the printed out template without the cross lines.

I hope you guys will find these templates useful, I know I will be using them!  No more drawing circles with cups and plates for me.

If you wind up using these templates feel free to link a photo your artwork in the comments section below!  I’d love to see your creations.






Selling your Art on POD Websites – RedBubble Edition

Selling your art on POD websites Redbubble edition

Hello fellow starving artists!  Today I am sharing some info about selling your art on POD (print on demand) websites, specifically Redbubble.

Some of you may have seen my past post about selling your art on POD websites where I compared the pros and cons of using Zazzle and Society6 to sell art online.

In this post I will be giving a review of my experiences with Redbubble where I have been selling my art for almost a year now!

So read on to learn more about selling your art on Redbubble!

Store Front

My first impressions when landing on the Rebubble homepage is that they are artist focused, cater to a trendy audience and have a sense of humour.

Their website layout is sleek and relatively easy to navigate. There are rotating featured artists and art works that are updated daily.

Individual store fronts are easily customized with a background, profile photo, bio, optional journal entries, and collections.  Your latest art works are also shown on the landing page.

On the design pages there are tabs which show which products are available with that design, reviews (of the product, not your art) and also comments.  Pro tip – leaving comments is a great way to connect with other Redbubble artists!

You can also “like” other people’s designs and “follow” other artists, which I definitely recommend doing.


In terms of products, the range is similar to Society6, and includes apparel, various electronics cases, and home decor items. The price points are about on par with other online POD stores and they often offer 20% off or other promotions.

Redbubble offers some unique products that are not on Zazzle or Society6, such as mini skirts, dresses and scarves among others.

Below is a picture of a scarf I purchased of my Blue and Gold Mandala Pattern.

scarf from redbubble

I love this scarf, the print turned out beautiful and the fabric is really nice and soft. I find it is well made.

I have also purchased a hoody, t-shirt and stickers of my own designs.  All are good quality and I have had no issues, however I did find the t-shirt a tad large for a size small.


A really popular product on Redbubble are stickers.  I usually sell a few every day, mostly of my Rose Gold Mandala design.  Below is a picture of several stickers I have purchased of my designs. They are super cute, and cheap too!

giveaway stickers

Ease of Upload

Redbubble’s uploading tool is by far my favourite out of all the POD sites I’ve tried.

I find it quite efficient because you can upload your main design and then resize it straight in the browser for each product type, rather than having to resize and upload your image multiple times.  There are also 2 tiling options, or you can replace the image entirely if neither of those options work.

You can also change the background colour straight in the browser too, which can be very handy when working with designs that have transparent backgrounds.

Earnings and Payment

It took about a month after opening my store before I saw any sales, but since then I have been getting relatively small but consistent earnings every month.  (I should note here that I was lucky enough to have a design featured on the front page which boosted my sales a lot.)

It’s not going to replace my day job any time soon, but any amount of extra cash is always welcome!

You can adjust the markup for individual products (in Account Settings), but it is automatically set to a generous 20%, which is better than some of the other sites I’ve found.

Earnings are paid out automatically around the 15th of every month (to Paypal, or direct deposit), and there is no minimum threshold so you are paid whatever you made in the previous month.

I don’t believe that Redbubble has an affiliate program like some of the others do.


The folks at Redbubble are pros at marketing themselves and driving traffic to their website (through Instagram and Facebook ads, etc), so it’s just a matter of getting your own designs out there (which is easier said than done).

Check out my post on Social Media Marketing Tips for Artists to learn more about how to do that.

If you’re lucky and get featured on their front page, then you’re golden.

You can also find some nice promotional tools on the Redbubble blog, for example, fun marketing templates like this one:

doughnut pillow mock upShipping

Redbubble has headquarters located in San Francisco (U.S.) and Melbourne (Australia) so the products are shipped from one of those areas depending on your location.

I have found they offer reasonable shipping costs to Canada, and even more reasonable within the U.S.  The shipping is generally pretty quick, and you can choose a faster shipping method if required.

Also, you get a free random sticker with every purchase! 


In sum, I highly recommend Redbubble for selling your art online!

If you have any questions, or if you want to share your own experiences with Redbubble please feel free to leave a comment below.  I hope you have found some useful information here!

Cheers!  Have a great week.




Social Media Marketing Tips For Artists

social media marketing tips for artists

Are you an artist trying to figure out how to market yourself on social media?  I was too, just a few years ago!

Since then, I’ve learned a lot and wanted to share some tips with you guys!

Please note: I am not an expert on this matter, and I don’t have thousands and thousands of followers. But I have managed to triple my stats on a few key social networks over the past year, and slowly but surely grown my online presence since creating the Julie Erin Designs brand.

To illustrate this, below is a screenshot of my Wordpress stats since starting this blog in 2013, and as you can see, it has gone up steadily each year.


By the way, I do have a full time job and other life commitments outside of this endeavor, so I am only able to dedicate a few hours per week to creating and marketing my designs.

This leads me into my first tip which is: Dedicate just 5-10 minutes a day to your social media game.

  • Start by taking on just one task on one of your social accounts.
  • Some examples include: Tweet an image of your latest work (don’t forget to include relevant hashtags). Like and/or follow some new users on Instagram.
  • Don’t feel overwhelmed.  You should be able to do this during your coffee or lunch break, on the way home from work on the bus, after dinner, or whenever you have an idle moment.

Focus on just a few social media platforms.

  • Try out different platforms but then hone it down to just a few, and then focus on content and growing your followers.  My top 3 are Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. I dabble on others but I get the most engagement for my time on those 3.

Set up a social media calendar, so you can easily plan and see what you need to do for the week.

  • Don’t overwhelm yourself with an over-loaded calendar.  Start with just one task per day that can be completed within a few minutes.
  • Create a visual calendar using your computer, a planner, or you can find lots of downloadable worksheets online.
  • Do what works for you and your schedule.
  • Learn the etiquette for your chosen social media app.  On Twitter you can share multiple times per day, but on Facebook you may only want to share something every few days.
  • Example: Monday: Tweet about your latest design, tweet 2 sold items.  Tuesday: Share a new design on Instagram.  Wednesday: Blog post about new design, and post to Facebook page.  Friday: Tweet new blog post.

Have a blog.

  • Use it to showcase your art work, items for sale, share art tips, supplies you use, your sketchbook, whatever you can think of.
  • Connect with other art bloggers. Follow/like/comment on their posts.
  • Pro tip: Don’t forget to link to your blog from your social media profiles.

Use (free) apps to make your life easier.

  • Buffer or Hootsuite.  Use one of these apps (or something similar) to schedule a few posts to your social media accounts for the day. This could even be your one task of the day, if that’s all you have time for.
  • Crowdfire or similar apps which help you track followers and unfollowers.  You can also search for people who follow similar accounts and then like/follow them.
  • Photo editing apps such as Canva and Photogrid. There are several out there, so find one that you like. Use it to create and edit images of your designs and products right on your phone.  While you could also just make these images in Photoshop on your PC, being able to make promo images on the go makes it so much easier to get it done when you have a spare moment.
  • Example of an advertisement I created using the Photogrid app:

mandala rainbow pastel leggings yoga workout pants

Keep a list of content ideas.

  • Keep a list on your phone or somewhere, so you never run out of ideas for fresh content!
  • Examples: Sold items, new designs, WIP’s and sketchbook shots.
  • Check out my Twitter and Instagram feeds for more content ideas!

Make use of hashtags (important for Twitter and Instagram especially).

  • Use relevant hashtags so that people can find your work.
  • …but don’t overdo it. Figure out what works on which platforms.
  • Monitor those hashtags and like/follow others who are posting to that hashtag.

Make use of tagging (Instagram and Twitter).

  • Sometimes, when appropriate, you may want to actually tag another user (such Zazzle or Redbubble for example) on Twitter or Instagram, if you are showcasing their product. You may get lucky and they might even re-tweet or feature your product!
  • Go through their tagged feeds to find similar users to like and follow.

Engage with similar users.

  • Connect with other bloggers, as mentioned above.
  • I sell my art work on POD websites such as Zazzle, Redbubble and Society6, so I try to engage with others who sell on those sites as well.  I do this by either liking their work directly on those sites, on social media, through forums or Facebook groups.

To learn more about selling your art on POD websites, check out my detailed post on the subject!

Post to shopping websites.

  • If this is appropriate to your style of art work, you may consider posting your products on shopping websites such as Pinterest, Polyvore, and Wanelo.

If you have the opportunity to do so, take a social media marketing course at your local college or university.

  • I took a short course which was very informative and turned me on to some new apps and strategies.
  • Think of it as an investment in your business.
  • One important thing I learned in the course is to have a Google + page – whether you like it or not.  Apparently this is very important for your SEO (it is Google!). You can easily post content to it using the Buffer app.

Speaking of SEO (search engine optimization)use it!

  • Do a quick search and learn some SEO basics which is especially important for your blog.

Other resources you may find helpful:

Where to sell your Art Online

Selling Your Art on POD Websites: Zazzle vs Society6 Pt. 1

Selling Your Art on POD Websites: Zazzle vs. Society6 Pt. 2

Blogging for your Art Business

Creative Apps for Adults

10 Ways to Get over Artist’s Blocks

Tips and Tools for Creative Entrepreneurs (Pinterest board)

I hope you guys have found some useful information here, and don’t forget to follow my blog to get more tips like these in the future!


Feel free to share some of your own social media marketing tips below!






My Design Process: Creating Line Art using Photoshop and Illustrator

creating line art in photoshop illustrator

Hello friends!

Today I wanted to share with you guys my design process, specifically one of the ways I like to create artwork for my POD webstores such as Redbubble, Zazzle, Society6, etc.

This is just one of many ways I create designs, and a technique you can use to turn black and white drawings into digital line art — which you can then use any way you choose.

  •  I usually start out with some ideas in my sketchbook, and sometimes make a short list of designs I would like to try.  I often look online for inspiration and have a few things in mind before I get started.


  • Once I have a design I like, I re-draw it lightly on a clean page (8.5″ x 11″) in pencil.
  • I go over the pencil drawing with a black Sharpie or another fine black ink pen, to get something like this:

sketches black and white

  • I scan each design separately into Photoshop.

line drawing in photoshop

  • I clean up the image as much as possible using tools such as desaturate, Brightness/Contrast, Curves, and erase to clean up any little black dots or dust bits that are showing.  I use colour selection tool to select the black line only, then create a new layer and fill in with black. Once I am finished with this step, I save the file as a .PSD.

live trace in illustrator

  • The result of this process is that you get much smoother lines than if you don’t use Image Trace in Illustrator.  This is important if you are having the designs printed, especially in large sizes.
  • Save the image as a .PNG (using Save for Web) and make sure it’s a large size (at least 6000 x 6000 pixels).  I believe you can also just save it as an Illustrator file and open it up in Photoshop.
  • Open up the .PNG image in Photoshop and fill or colour it in however you desire.  I like to use layers, fill with gradients and use layer settings (ex. Screen) or just paint on another layer using a drawing tablet.  There is basically an endless variety of ways you can use your line art.
  • Save your finished design as the correct file type and size(s) for the POD site you are creating for.  I always save a .PSD file as well (with all my layers in tact) so I can open it again later and use the same design multiple times.

Here are some examples of work that I have used this technique for:

tangled black and white yin yang mandala live trace illustrator pot head teapot live trace illustrator tutorialtangled rainbow world map illustrator live trace

And there you have it!  Hopefully you now have a little bit of insight into how I create my designs for sale, and maybe even learned a new technique to try out for yourself.

Feel free to leave any questions or comments about this process in the comments section below.

Have a great week everyone!



10 Websites to Sell Your Art Online

where to sell art online

Hey guys!

I wanted to kick off a batch of more informational posts with a list of some great websites where you can sell your art online!

This is not an exhaustive list by any means, but these are sites that I actually have experience with and that I know to be legitimate.  I also know that they provide good quality products and customer service, which is definitely important if you want to have happy, repeat customers.

Not all websites are created equal and some are straight up scams so be careful out there, and start with one or more of the ones on this list before venturing into unknown territory!

Pro Tip: Generally speaking, avoid Chinese based websites.  All these ones listed below are US based companies.


1. Zazzle 

Zazzle is where I first started my journey of selling my art online.  It is known as a POD website, which means “Print on Demand”, ie. a product is printed and shipped only after it has been sold.

It’s free to open a store, multiple stores in fact, and upload unlimited designs. There is also a helpful forum with supportive members which is a great place to show off your designs and get tips and feedback.

I have had minor success so far on Zazzle, with nearly 1000 products in my catalog to date.  They carry a huge range of products to design on, but it can sometimes be overwhelming and cumbersome to upload each design individually.

Read more about creating on Zazzle in my post, Selling your art on POD websites: Zazzle vs Society6.


2. Society6

Society6 was the second website I uploaded my artwork to.  It’s also a POD site like Zazzle, but they have a smaller range of products.  However, their products are high quality and the look of the website is more like an artist’s portfolio.

It’s free to upload unlimited designs to Society6, and the only downside, in my opinion, is the lack of a forum to connect with other sellers. (However there are groups on Facebook for this).

It took a good while for me to start seeing sales on Society6 (compared to Zazzle) but lately it seems to be gaining momentum.  My advice is to just keep at it.  It’s fairly easy to upload and add new designs to Society6 so I generally upload my newest designs here first.

Read more detailed info and my full review of selling on Society6 here: Selling your art on POD websites: Zazzle vs Society6.


3. Redbubble

I just started selling my work on Redbubble this year (2016).  It’s another POD website but they have a few different kinds of products than the others.  Scarves, dresses and mini skirts to name a few!

I find Redbubble to be quite artist focused, and they do a lot of advertising for you.

It’s free to upload unlimited designs, and they have a forum full of supportive members.

I got lucky so far on Redbubble and had one of my designs “featured” so I got several sales out of that!  It was this design.


4. Tee Public

Tee Public is T-shirt focused, as the name suggests.  You can only upload .png images (with a transparent background), so graphic and vector styles do well here.  All over patterns won’t work.  The uploading process is really quick and easy!

If you create fan art, typographic designs, or other styles that work well on t-shirts then Tee Public might be perfect for you!  It is free to create a store and add as many designs as you like.

Get some design ideas from my own Tee Public store.


5. Fine Art America

I have had a store on Fine Art America for some time now but have sold absolutely nothing!

Don’t let that deter you though, I think it is more fine art based, so if your art style is more based around painting or photography then you might do well on there. You can also sell original art works which is pretty cool.

It’s free to open a store and to upload your first 25 designs.

They also have a lot of opportunities to enter contests and other ways to participate in the community which is great for exposure.


6. Design By Humans

I only just recently opened up a shop on here.  I only have a couple of designs so far, and no sales yet.

To me it seems to be fairly similar to Redbubble, and they have a small range of good quality products.

It’s free to open a store and upload up to 500 designs.  I think it will take me a good long time to get to 500 products anyway so I don’t think it’s limiting.  It seems pretty easy to upload designs.  I noticed you can choose a model for each category which is kind of fun way to customize your store.

They also have a forum, and contests which I have yet to check out but should be great for exposure!


7. Etsy

I have sold on Etsy in the past but I do not have any products on there currently.

This is not a POD site but it is the most well known website for selling hand made goods.  You can also sell download-able graphics or print-ables.

This is a great place to post your work especially if you are into selling hand made clothing, accessories, paintings, jewelry etc.

There is a small fee to upload, 20 cents per listing I believe, but you do get 20 free listings to start off with.


8. CafePress

CafePress is another well known POD website, similar to the ones mentioned above.

They have a large range of products, like Zazzle. I don’t have much experience with it yet but I know it is legit, and I plan to open a shop here soon.

Once I have some more experience with it I’ll update here!


9. Casetify

This is another legit POD website, focused on customize-able electronics cases and iWatch bands.  I have tried applying several times but have not been accepted to become a designer, but I suggest you try as perhaps your style is more to their liking.  Let me know if you have any luck!

Again, I will update with more info if/when I get more experience with selling on here.


10. Amazon Merch

Sell your designs on T-shirts through the online sales giant Amazon!  Currently only available to U.S. buyers, but anyone can sell their t-shirt centered designs after being accepted to the program.

I have a few of my own designs on there currently but have yet to make any sales, so I don’t have much more to report on it yet.


That’s all I have for now!

If you stuck around this long, I applaud and thank you for taking the time to read all this information I’ve compiled for you.  I hope you have found something useful here and I wish you the best of luck with selling your art online!

If you have any questions or comments feel free to leave them below 🙂